The other day I posted about how the American Medical Association has decided to try and outlaw home birth. A...
The other day I posted about how the American Medical Association has decided to try and outlaw home birth. A stupid move, in my opinion. Although it does show why I decided to quit going to school for midwifery. Why I'm not a midwife. I went to college for nursing, with plans to go into a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) program. However, after spending time in a hospital doing nursing clinicals, I couldn't take being in the hospital anymore. When I'd worked as a doula, I saw some pretty rough hospital births due to interventions, but I figured that once I got into a hospital, I could create positive birth changes from the inside, but what I saw going on in hospitals were CNMs adjusting to hospital policy, not the hospital adjusting to normal, natural birth options. More often than not, in my experience, I've seen just as many hospital midwives as doctors go straight to drugs and interventions before trying a birthing ball, aromatherapy, or other less evasive labor technique. What I started to realize is that it's not the care provider, so much as the birth setting. Keep in mind, that I've also run into some excellent, normal birth and women supportive care providers in the hospital - midwives, doctors, and nurses; however, it's not the norm. If you don't believe me go to nursing school and you'll see for yourself, heck, go spend a couple of days on a maternity ward and you'll see what I mean. When I was going to college, I interviewed countless midwives both CNMs and licensed, and there was always an air of secret club about it with the non hospital midwives. Homebirth midwives I'd interview often wouldn't allow me to use their names in papers I wrote, and I totally get why. Midwives have to deal with all sorts of legal issues. I've met midwives banned from practicing, midwives who can't get insurance, midwives who operate in secret, midwives in jail due to something that might get a doctor a small slap on the wrist, and it's all so insane. It's not fair that a trained midwife would need to be secretive about her calling, when doctors strut around. Because of my negative hospital experiences, I decided to quit perusing the CNM degree and switch to a licensed midwife program, but as it turns out, I didn't get that far. The final straw for me was in New Mexico, when it became almost impossible for midwives to get malpractice insurance. It was then I started thinking long and hard about midwifery, and if I really wanted to constantly deal with all these issues. I have a son to consider. I can't go to jail for simply doing my job. I love the entire world of midwifery, doula work, women and birth, but frankly, I love my son more. I can't live stressed out all the time and worry about my job 24/7. I'm really proud of all the women out there continuing to pursue midwifery, and I'm glad that for now homebirth and a great midwife and doula will be available to me if I have another baby, but it's not the life for me because of all the complications. That is really sad. I still offer doula services from time to time though, and I still support midwives, because I want the homebirth choice, the midwife choice available to all women. If you do too then hook up with one or more of the following resources:
    I have this awesome article from one of my old copies of Midwifery Today too; with more resources and ideas that can help you support midwives. I'll look for that today and post it later if I find it. Up next some links on the safety of homebirth...

    Tags: american medical association homebirth choice homebirth midwives midwife laws safety of homebirth


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